Friends pay tribute to Malcolm Fraser, also dubbed king of the camellias

It is a small and close community on the Mornington Peninsula which Malcolm and Tamie Fraser have called home for close to two decades.
杭州龙凤

A community of families and friends.

The local wineries and restaurants are popular meeting places and the golf course a social hub.

Local resident and former managing director of The Age, Ranald Macdonald, often met the Frasers for dinner, a swing of the sticks and to chew over meaty conversation on topics such as foreign policy.

Mr Macdonald is effusive in his respect for Malcolm Fraser, who spent almost three decades in federal parliament, his sharp intellect and his willingness to make a point or open a discussion.

“He encouraged lively debate with really intelligent and thought-provoking opinions,” Mr Macdonald said on Friday.

“He was good company, a challenging man and someone who contributed right to the end, unlike a lot of other people who left politics.”

Mr Macdonald described Mr Fraser as “a very remarkable Australian” who challenged us all.

Malcolm Fraser was the youngest member of federal parliament when elected at the age of 25 after growing up on Nareen Station near Hamilton in the Western District.

The Melbourne Grammar and Oxford-educated Mr Fraser was a brave and sharp conversationalist.

Mr Macdonald said the enthusiasm, fascination and intellect of Mr Fraser’s argument on important national and international policy issues remained to his last days.

“We spent quite a lot of time with him … lively chatter over good food and good wine,” he said.

The flags flew at half mast at the Flinders Golf Club on Friday where the Frasers are members.

Malcolm Fraser came to golf late and enjoyed the sport, Mr Macdonald said.

“But being a tall man perhaps didn’t have the ball under control,” he said.

Mrs Fraser, also a keen golfer, helped organise an annual charity golf day at the club to raise money for the National Stroke Foundation.

It’s rumoured Tamie Fraser is a little more successful with the clubs.

“We would see Malcolm and Tamie play together fairly regularly in the afternoons,” a Flinders Golf Club regular said.

He said the couple were well liked at the club.

Mr Macdonald talks of the remarkable support Tamie provided to Malcolm and the warmth of their relationship.

“A genuine full-time love affair for over 50 years – it was a love affair right to the end,” he said.

Another of their joint loves was gardening on their 1.6-hectare Red Hill South property, Thurulgoona.

In a 2003 article Mrs Fraser described Malcolm as “king of the camellias”.

Mr Fraser even accidentally bred a new variety that was named Camellia japonica.

The former prime minister was also a car enthusiast and a keen fly fisherman, stocking trout on the Red Hill South property.

He discovered the cathartic allure of casting a fly during the pressure-filled days of federal parliament.

Today’s politicians remembered a great Victorian.

“Malcolm Fraser was a Victorian of purpose and principle – an architect of our diversity and a giant of stature, intellect and legacy,” Premier Daniel Andrews said.

“For decades, he served the people of Western Victoria. For a lifetime, he served the contest of Australian ideas. We’re all better for it.”

The original release of this article first appeared on the website of Wuxi Plastic Surgery Hospital.